fortune collocations and examples

 UK /ˈfɔː(r)tʃən/

Explore meanings in the Dictionary
1

a very large amount of money


Adjectives frequently used with fortune
large: absolute informal, considerable, enormous, great, huge, immense, large, vastIt must have cost an absolute fortune – but then, they can afford it.He had inherited a considrable fortune from his aunt.Vast fortunes have been made from the trade of cotton, tobacco and sugar.

Usage note

The expression a small fortune means ‘a lot of money’: We paid a small fortune for this holiday.

small: smallIt cost me a small fortune to get all the photos developed.belonging to the person: personalShe has a personal fortune of over a million dollars.

Verbs frequently used with fortune
get or save a fortune: accumulate, acquire, amass, earn, inherit, make, saveBy living economically they amassed a considerable fortune.Save a fortune by not driving.spend or lose a fortune: lose, pay, put at stake, spend, squanderThe company has spent a fortune researching and developing new treatments.cost a fortune: costThis is a practical car that doesn’t cost a fortune to run.
2

the good and bad things that happen to someone


Adjectives frequently used with fortune
changing: changing, fluctuating, mixedThe theatre opened in 1815 and continued with fluctuating fortunes until 1908.getting worse: ailing, declining, flaggingHe aims to revive the party’s flagging fortunes.different to others: contrastingIt is interesting to consider the contrasting fortunes of the two clubs.in a particular area: economic, electoral, politicalA downturn in your economic fortunes can offer a valuable opportunity to rethink your priorities.
Verbs frequently used with fortune
change fortunes: change, restore, reverse, revive, transformIt is part of an attempt to revive the fortunes of central Birmingham.follow fortunes: followThe play follows the fortunes of two young women, Fatima and Laura.
Verbs that frequently follow fortune
decline: decline, dwindle, ebb, waneThe town’s fortunes declined from the start of the 17th century.improve: improve, reviveWith the publication of his novel his fortunes improved.change: change, fluctuate, swing, turnSince the newspaper began measuring the popularity of politicians, his fortunes have fluctuated.
Nouns + in frequently used before fortune
change, decline, downturn, improvement, resurgence, turnaround, upturnThe opening of the new arts centre signalled an upturn in the fortunes of the town.
Nouns + of frequently used before fortune
reversalThe economy had suffered a dramatic reversal of fortunes.
3

luck, especially good luck


Adjectives frequently used with fortune
good: goodI had the very good fortune to have a job that was both challenging and fun.bad: bad, illSome people think this award brings bad fortune.
Verbs frequently used with fortune
bring (someone), give (someone)The spirit of the well is supposed to give good fortune to those who throw in coins.
Verbs that frequently follow fortune
favour someone, smile on someoneFor years fortune favoured him, and everything he touched succeeded.
Nouns + of frequently used before fortune
occasion when something good happens: piece, strokeWe did have one piece of good fortune when someone offered us a flat to rent at a reasonable price.

Usage note

Fortune is almost always preceded by good in these combinations: By a stroke of good fortune I was in the right place at the right time.

change: change, reversalThey were still hoping for a change of fortune in the business.
 
Vocabulary quiz: trending words of 2020

Macmillan learn live love play